Rob Roy Way

Discover many of the places linked to Rob Roy MacGregor on this beautiful and historic route.

EasyWays was recommended to me by friends who used the company last year. The service they provided for my walk of the Rob Roy Way was excellent!

– Leslie

Strenuous Terrain
Part Waymarked
Beginner Navigation Skills
79 Miles / 127 km

Route Stops

Drymen is the starting point of the Rob Roy Way. The town sits in the hills at the western end of the Campsie Fells, overlooking the Endrick Water as it nears Loch Lomond. In the 18th and 19th centuries, Drymen was a popular stopover for Highland cattle drovers. The beautiful parish was built in 1771 and just outside the village are the substantial ruins of Buchanan Castle, a former stronghold of the powerful Grahams of Montrose which dates back to the 17th century. Other sites of interest include The Clachan Inn, which was first licensed in 1734, and the remains of a medieval motte which can be seen by the bridge in the village. Overnight in Drymen.

This first stage of the Way makes for a good beginning as the distance is short and the walk is along a combination of minor roads and forestry track, north to the Trossachs town of Aberfoyle. Views are limited over the Campsie Fells and Gargunnock Hills, on forestry ground that is waymarked by a combination of blue markers and yellow arrows. The route takes in Queen Elizabeth Forest Park, with views to Ben Lomond and passes Loch Katrine, home of the famous Sir Walter Scott steamship and the main water supply to Glasgow.

The second stage of the Rob Roy Way climbs gently through the forests of the Trossachs, overviewed by the Menteith Hills before descending with grand views to Loch Venachar, to end at the picturesque town of Callander, the ‘Gateway to the Highlands’. This part of the walk is a combination of road and track that can be boggy in places, so care should be taken, however the views to Ben Lomond and Ben Ledi make the effort worthwhile.

The third section of the Rob Roy Way leads out of Callander, through woods alongside the shores of Loch Lubnaig. It follows the loch on a well-defined cycle path for most of the distance, to reach the village of Strathyre by crossing a wooden suspension bridge at the River Balvag. It is possible to detour off the path, signposted approximately 3 km out of Callander, to visit the Falls of Leny.

Leave Strathyre by following a forest track above the east side of the glen, passing by the Mhor 84 Motel and on to a cycle path. Heading towards Balquidder until you reach the line of the old railway above Lochearnhead. Follow this north through Glen Ogle, before descending through woods past the Falls of Dochart to reach Killin.

On leaving Killin by the bridge over the Falls of Dochart, the Way ascends over moorland along the south side of Loch Tay. The moorland is extremely open in adverse weather conditions. There are good views to the north/west before it descends to cross the Newton Burn. Continue through Brae Farm to Ardeonaig. The official stage is 2.5 miles further on, at Ardtalnaig, but there is currently no accommodation there. If there is no availability at the Ardeonaig Hotel, then it may be necessary to spend a second overnight in Killin with a taxi transfer from and to Ardtalnaig.

The penultimate section of the Rob Roy Way is arguably the most picturesque. Follow the single track road to Ardtalnaig and continue on the south side of Loch Tay to reach Achran, before ascending up past the impressive Falls of Acharn and following varied paths and forestry tracks with fantastic views all around, including Taymouth Castle and Schiehallion. This section ends by passing the Falls of Moness down through the Birks of Aberfeldy and on into the Highland town.

The final part of the Rob Roy Way follows the River Tay east out of Aberfeldy past Dewars World of Whisky along footpaths on the edge of the River Tay to the village of Grandtully. A final climb then leads up over the moors, taking direction signs to Pitlochry before a forested descent leads to the suspension bridge over the River Tummel and journey’s end at the town.

Congratulations – you have completed the Rob Roy Way! After breakfast, it is time to set off on your onward journey.

Rob Roy Way

79 miles / 127 km

Beginning at the picturesque village of Drymen and passing through The Trossachs National Park before finishing in the bustling tourist town of Pitlochry; this beautiful and historic route offers a similar (but more tranquil) walk experience to the West Highland Way.

As the name suggests, the route follows the many places linked with Rob Roy MacGregor, the legendary Scottish outlaw of the early 1700s.

Walk through Loch Ard Forest to Aberfoyle, before reaching the Menteith Hills and pass Loch Venachar into Callander, where, in a converted church overlooking a paved square is located the Rob Roy and Trossachs Visitor Centre.

Continue on the disused Callander and Oban Railway tracks to Strathyre, passing the peak of Ben Ledi and following the west shore of Loch Lubnaig (with an option to visit  Balquhidder to view Rob Roy’s Grave), before returning the additional two miles to pick up the Way again to Lochearnhead.

Climb up Glen Ogle to arrive at Killin home of the wonderful Falls of Dochart, walking on quiet single track roads on the south side of Loch Tay to Ardtalnaig, before reaching Aberfeldy and finally ending the trek at historic Pitlochry via the swaying suspension bridge over the River Tummel built in 1913.

Quality Accommodation

Door to Door Baggage Transfer (min 18kg)

Rucksack Readers Guide Book

Location Details For Each Accommodation

Travel Information from start to finish

Sugguested Equipment List

Route Packages

1 Arrive in Drymen
2 Drymen to Aberfoyle (10 miles / 16 km)
3 Aberfoyle to Callander (10 miles / 16 km)
4 Callander to Strathyre (9 miles / 15 km)
5 Strathyre to Killin (12 miles / 19 km)
6 Killin to Ardeonaig (Ardtalnaig) (12 miles / 19 km)
7 Ardeonaig (Ardtalnaig) to Aberfeldy (15 miles / 24 km)
8 Aberfeldy to Pitlochry (11 miles / 18 km)
9 Depart Pitlochry

What’s included?

  • 8 nights’ accommodation in quality B&Bs, guest houses, inns and hotels Rooms with shower/wc (where available)
  • Breakfast
  • Door to door baggage transfer – maximum 18 kg per bag
  • Rucksack Readers Guide Book
  • GPS Mapping App detailing full tour and accommodations
  • Travel information to the start and from the finish of the walk
  • Suggested equipment list
  • Emergency support

What’s not included?

  • Evening meals, packed lunches and drinks
  • Travel insurance

1 Arrive in Drymen
2 Drymen to Aberfoyle (10 miles / 16 km)
3 Aberfoyle to Strathyre (19 miles / 30 km)
4 Strathyre to Killin (12 miles / 19 km)
5 Killin to Ardeonaig (Ardtalnaig) (12 miles / 19 km)
6 Ardeonaig (Ardtalnaig) to Aberfeldy (15 miles / 24 km)
7 Aberfeldy to Pitlochry (11 miles / 18 km)

What’s included?

  • 7 nights’ accommodation in quality B&Bs, guest houses, inns and hotels Rooms with shower/wc (where available)
  • Breakfast
  • Door to door baggage transfer – maximum 18 kg per bag
  • Rucksack Readers Guide Book
  • GPS Mapping App detailing full tour and accommodations
  • Travel information to the start and from the finish of the walk
  • Suggested equipment list
  • Emergency support

What’s not included?

  • Evening meals, packed lunches and drinks
  • Travel insurance

First established in 1996, EasyWays has built a strong reputation with the UK and International walking community in the delivery of walking tours throughout Scotland.

The template of every successful business is grounded in long term relationships, and EasyWays, along with our accommodation providers and baggage transfer companies work as one to ensure your walk experience is both enjoyable and memorable.

As a Scottish based company we are close at hand to the walking routes and pride ourselves in delivering a bespoke service – tell us what you would like and we will build an itinerary to match.